Who Watches the Watchers - Forum for the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe & Similar Works

You are not logged in. Would you like to login or register?



6/09/2022 5:00 pm  #1


Finding Firsts

The challenge with this thread is to mention what you thing might be the first of something and see if anyone can come up with an earlier example. I plan to keep a master list at the topic and people and suggest topics to add. Try to come up with something that there's a reasonable chance that someone might unearth an earlier example. It's unlikely for example that an earlier James Bond actor than Barry Nelson will be unearthed

First superhero
Parameters: Must have costumes, powers, and a secret identity, plus do things that people would see as heroicl any medium
Suggested answer: Human Bat from The Funny Wonder (1899) - Loki mentioned in the general Things People Keep Getting Wrong Thread.

First superhero to debut in a comics story in a comic book
Parameters: Must have costumes, powers, and a secret identity, plus do things that people would see as heroic; must have debuted in a comic book story but not a text feature within a comic book
Suggested answer: Doctor Occult: New Fun Comics #6 (Oct. 1935) in general; More Fun Comics #14 (Oct. 1936) in superhero costume. Loki notes that while the Funny Wonder was a comic book, the Human Bat appeared in an illustrated text story, Otherwise he would count here as well.

First meta horror movie: vampire
Parameters: At least one character must be aware they're in a scenario where horror movie rules apply and attempt to use their knowledge to survive throughout. Must involve vampires in some fashion.
Suggested answer: zuckyd1: Fright Night (1985): vampire knowledge used throughout for survival. Honourable mention: Loki: Salem's Lot (1979): miniseries, not movie; only one meta use.

First meta horror movie - dead teenager sub-genre - would be victims try to use tropes
Parameters: At least one character must be aware they're in a scenario where horror movie rules apply and attempt to use their knowledge to survive, with some success. Must follow at least some of the tropes of dead teenager movies, which are usually slasher flicks.
Suggested answer: There's Nothing Out There (1991); while the thread isn't humanoid, a character is actively using his knowledge of movie tropes to survive the danger, and shares his knowledge with his friends. Honourable mentions: New Nightmare (1994): threat is humanoid in form, though hero not taking advantage of horror movie tropes; Scream (1996): threat is humanoid in form, heroes taking advantage of horror movie tropes.

First meta horror movie - it's futile
Parameters: At least one character must be aware they're in a scenario where horror movie rules apply but not necessarily able to stop what's going to happen
Suggested answer: Unmasked Part 25 (1988). It's the killer (Jackson) who understands the tropes but he comes to realize he's ultimately unable to change things.

First comic book protagonist death - later reversed
Parameters: The lead of a comic book feature is killed off, though later brought back
Suggested answer: The Comet: Died in Pep Comics #17 December 1941; brought back in the 1960s. There is little doubt that he's the first superhero to be killed off, but it's possible that a non-superhero lead was killed earlier.

First comic book protagonist death - never reversed
Parameters: The lead of a comic book feature is killed off, and remains dead
Suggested answer: 711. Killed in Police Comics #16 (January 1943). Never brought back.

First use of drugs in a children's book
Parameters: Characters are implicitly or explicitly affected by drugs
Suggested answer: Loki suggests: Alice in Wonderland (1865). The caterpillar smokes using a hookah, which might only contain tobacco, but which was often associated with smoking hashish. And Alice does partake of mushrooms which have...interesting side effects. Andy's note: The Disney version come to think of it seemed to reinforce the idea that the Caterpillar was on drugs; while that's a movie, it shows they were aware of the context.

First use of Martians in popular fiction
Parameters: Story must contain at least one character from Mars; any medium
Suggested answer:  Bernard De Fontenelle and his Conversations on the Plurality of Worlds (1686) (suggested by Loki)

First team-up by characters from different companies
Parameters: Characters must be owned by two different companies at the time of the team-up (not in public domain), and be fully authorized by both companies; any medium, can even be a mix of media
Suggested answer: See cinematic universe answer below.

First team-up by comic characters from different companies
Parameters: Characters must be owned by two different companies at the time of the team-up (not in public domain), and be fully authorized by both companies; must be comics (strips or books)
Suggested answer: All Star Comics #3 (Dec. 1940). Members of the Justice Society composed of characters who were at the time owned by National and All-American. The next issue was the first time they went into battle together.

First meeting of two lead comic book characters
Parameters: Must be main characters of different strips in comic books, but can be from the same anthology
Suggested answer: Marvel Mystery Comics #8 June 1940: Human Torch and Sub-Mariner meet.

First recurring yellow peril villain
Paramaters: Villain must be of Asian descent, appear in more than one story, and be intended to tap into Caucasian fears of Asian people
Suggested answer: Fu Manchu in The Mystery of Fu Manchu

First recurring stand-in as yellow peril villain
Paramaters: Villain appear in more than one story, be intended to tap into Caucasian fears of Asian people, but not actually be from an Asian country
Suggested: Ming the Merciless from the Flash Gordon comic strip Jan 21, 1934). Extraterrestrial but with clear Asian features

First television mini-series, adaptation
Parameters: Television series devoted to a single subject as opposed to anthology, but always intended to end after the first season; adapted from non-TV work.
Suggested: zuckyd1: Ann and Harold, BBC, 1938, adapted from a radio play, 5 episodes but a sixth was originally planned. Since it was adapted from a single play and depicts a couple's developing romance, it was probably serialized. [Andy: thus possibly incomplete]; honourable mention: zuckyd1: Dr. Death, US, 1945. A 4-part thriller adapted from a novel, so probably serialized. [Andy: This may be the first completed miniseries]

First television mini-series, original story
Parameters: Television series devoted to a single subject as opposed to anthology, but always intended to end after the first season. Can feature characters seen before but must be itself a new story.
Suggested: Loki: The Broken Horseshoe (March-April 1952); honourable mentions, Loki: The Quatermass Experiment (1953) (first sci-fi), zuckyd1: Davy Crockett (1954-55), first in US

First television mini-series: seralized/original work.
Parameters: Television series devoted to a single subject as opposed to anthology, but always intended to end after the first season. Must be designed so that if you skip an episode, you miss key details. Can feature characters seen before but must be itself a new story.
Suggested: V. Brand new characters, story doesn't work if yolu miss a part.

First cinematic universe (topic suggested by Loki):
Parameters: Characters who debuted in unrelated movies meet up in a subsequent movie, thus establishing that they share the same world. Date of universe being established comes from the movie that had the first crossover, not the first movie in the franchise (otherwise this title could become meaningless, as someone could do a sequel in 2023 to a 1901 movie and snatch the title retroactively).
Suggested: While many might think this was Universal Monsters, who began crossing over 1943's Frankenstein Meets the Wolfman (Dracula later crossed over too, meaning this universe overall debuted in 1931), I think the real winner is 20th Century Fox's unintended "detectiverse": 
In 1929 Fox made its first Charlie Chan movie, Behind That Curtain (the third overall to feature said detective, but first produced by them); in 1931 the made the first starring Warner Oland as Chan, Charlie Chan Carries On, and he went on to star in 16 films in total as Chan. Even if we considered BTC not to be part of the series because it had a different actor, once Oland was in the role we had a series. One of the co-stars of that series was Keye Luke as "Number One Son" Lee Chan. In 1937 Fox launched another film series with Think Fast Mr Moto, this time based round Japanese detective Mr Moto, played by Peter Lorre. And the third film of that series, Mr Moto's Gamble (April 1938), co-starred Keye Luke reprising his role as Lee Chan; Moto even mentions to Lee that he has exchanged messages with Charlie, confirming the shared universe. So the Fox Moto/Chan cinematic universe was established in 1938, five years ahead of Universal's Monsterverse.

First pop culture reference within a fiction (explicit)
Parameters: Another work that is not necessarily canon to the story presented is explicity referenced
Suggested answer: (Loki) A Study in Scarlet (Beeton's Christmas Annual 1887) - Holmes and Watson mention Edgar Allen Poe's detective Dupin in a context that definitely suggests they think he is fictional:
Quoting Watson:
“It is simple enough as you explain it,” I said, smiling. “You remind me of Edgar Allen Poe’s Dupin. I had no idea that such individuals did exist outside of stories.”

First pop culture reference within a fiction (implicit)
Parameters: Another work that is not necessarily canon to the story presented is aluded to but isn't explictly stated as such).
Suggested answer: Dumbo (1941). In this movie, the train goes "I think I can, I think I can", a reference to the book The Little Engine that Could (1930). The latter isn't directly mentioned but is certainly quoted.

Last edited by Andy E. Nystrom (6/10/2022 4:15 pm)


My photostream (over 6 million photos!)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/24917258@N05/
 

6/10/2022 3:10 am  #2


Re: Finding Firsts

Andy E. Nystrom wrote:

First use of Martians in popular fiction
Parameters: Story must contain at least one character from Mars; any medium
Suggested answer: War of the Worlds (H.G. Wells), originally serialized in 1897 in Pearson's Magazine and Cosmopolitan
 

H.G. Wells? That Johnny-come-lately! Try Bernard De Fontenelle and his Conversations on the Plurality of Worlds (1686)
https://comicvine.gamespot.com/a/uploads/original/8/85763/8530488-lifeonmars.jpg


 

 

6/10/2022 5:09 am  #3


Re: Finding Firsts

Thanks. I've updated the first post.


My photostream (over 6 million photos!)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/24917258@N05/
     Thread Starter
 

6/10/2022 5:22 am  #4


Re: Finding Firsts

Andy E. Nystrom wrote:

First superhero
Parameters: Must have costumes, powers, and a secret identity, plus do things that people would see as heroicl any medium
Suggested answer: Human Bat from The Funny Wonder (1899) - Loki mentioned in the general Things People Keep Getting Wrong Thread.

First comic book superhero
Parameters: Must have costumes, powers, and a secret identity, plus do things that people would see as heroic; must have debuted in a comic book
Suggested answer: Doctor Occult: New Fun Comics #6 (Oct. 1935) in general; More Fun Comics #14 (Oct. 1936) in superhero costume
 

I should also point out that The Funny Wonder was a comic (see this example of the cover from 1897)
https://comicvine.gamespot.com/a/uploads/original/8/85763/8530582-9816012079-latest.jpg

albeit the Human Bat appeared in an illustrated text story rather than one of the comic strips. So he remains the first (currently found so far) superhero to debut in a comic, but not the first to debut in a comic strip.

 

6/10/2022 5:45 am  #5


Re: Finding Firsts

First cinematic universe:
Parameters: Characters who debuted in unrelated movies meet up in a subsequent movie, thus establishing that they share the same world. Date of universe being established comes from the movie that had the first crossover, not the first movie in the franchise (otherwise this title could become meaningless, as someone could do a sequel in 2023 to a 1901 movie and snatch the title retroactively).
Suggested: While many might think this was Universal Monsters, who began crossing over 1943's Frankenstein Meets the Wolfman (Dracula later crossed over too, meaning this universe overall debuted in 1931), I think the real winner is 20th Century Fox's unintended "detectiverse": 
In 1929 Fox made its first Charlie Chan movie, Behind That Curtain (the third overall to feature said detective, but first produced by them); in 1931 the made the first starring Warner Oland as Chan, Charlie Chan Carries On, and he went on to star in 16 films in total as Chan. Even if we considered BTC not to be part of the series because it had a different actor, once Oland was in the role we had a series. One of the co-stars of that series was Keye Luke as "Number One Son" Lee Chan. In 1937 Fox launched another film series with Think Fast Mr Moto, this time based round Japanese detective Mr Moto, played by Peter Lorre. And the third film of that series, Mr Moto's Gamble (April 1938), co-starred Keye Luke reprising his role as Lee Chan; Moto even mentions to Lee that he has exchanged messages with Charlie, confirming the shared universe. So the Fox Moto/Chan cinematic universe was established in 1938, five years ahead of Universal's Monsterverse.

 

6/10/2022 5:48 am  #6


Re: Finding Firsts

Andy E. Nystrom wrote:

First use of drugs in a children's book
Parameters: Characters are implicitly or explicitly affected by drugs
Suggested answer: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900). The poppy field puts everyone to sleep, the obvious implication being that the poppies are acting as an opioid.

Possibly debatable, but Alice in Wonderland (1865). The caterpillar smokes using a hookah, which might only contain tobacco, but which was often associated with smoking hashish. And Alice does partake of mushrooms which have...interesting side effects.

 

6/10/2022 5:51 am  #7


Re: Finding Firsts

Loki wrote:

First cinematic universe:
Parameters: Characters who debuted in unrelated movies meet up in a subsequent movie, thus establishing that they share the same world. Date of universe being established comes from the movie that had the first crossover, not the first movie in the franchise (otherwise this title could become meaningless, as someone could do a sequel in 2023 to a 1901 movie and snatch the title retroactively).
Suggested: While many might think this was Universal Monsters, who began crossing over 1943's Frankenstein Meets the Wolfman (Dracula later crossed over too, meaning this universe overall debuted in 1931), I think the real winner is 20th Century Fox's unintended "detectiverse": 
In 1929 Fox made its first Charlie Chan movie, Behind That Curtain (the third overall to feature said detective, but first produced by them); in 1931 the made the first starring Warner Oland as Chan, Charlie Chan Carries On, and he went on to star in 16 films in total as Chan. Even if we considered BTC not to be part of the series because it had a different actor, once Oland was in the role we had a series. One of the co-stars of that series was Keye Luke as "Number One Son" Lee Chan. In 1937 Fox launched another film series with Think Fast Mr Moto, this time based round Japanese detective Mr Moto, played by Peter Lorre. And the third film of that series, Mr Moto's Gamble (April 1938), co-starred Keye Luke reprising his role as Lee Chan; Moto even mentions to Lee that he has exchanged messages with Charlie, confirming the shared universe. So the Fox Moto/Chan cinematic universe was established in 1938, five years ahead of Universal's Monsterverse.

It occurs to me that since both Chan (and his son) and Moto were licensed by Fox and not PD at the time, they might beat the JSA crossover to first authorized crossover too. 

 

6/10/2022 5:58 am  #8


Re: Finding Firsts

I've added in Loki's suggestions and added a few more topics.


My photostream (over 6 million photos!)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/24917258@N05/
     Thread Starter
 

6/10/2022 6:07 am  #9


Re: Finding Firsts

Andy E. Nystrom wrote:

First pop culture reference within a fiction
Parameters: Another work that is not necessarily canon to the story presented is aluded to
Suggested answer: Dumbo (1941). In this movie, the train goes "I think I can, I think I can", a reference to the book The Little Engine that Could (1930).

There's likely earlier than my following suggestion, but we've definitely got earlier than Dumbo:
A Study in Scarlet (Beeton's Christmas Annual 1887) - Holmes and Watson mention Edgar Allen Poe's detective Dupin in a context that definitely suggests they think he is fictional:
Quoting Watson:
“It is simple enough as you explain it,” I said, smiling. “You remind me of Edgar Allen Poe’s Dupin. I had no idea that such individuals did exist outside of stories.”

 

6/10/2022 6:22 am  #10


Re: Finding Firsts

I've added in Loki's latest answer but modified the original pop culture question as a separate First because quoting an earlier work without mentioning it directly strikes me as a slightly different phenomenon. Buffy for example frequently quoted older works but rarely if ever mentioned them directly, so that sort of thing is more what I was getting at.


My photostream (over 6 million photos!)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/24917258@N05/
     Thread Starter
 

6/10/2022 6:42 am  #11


Re: Finding Firsts

Andy E. Nystrom wrote:

First meta horror movie - would be victims try to use tropes
Parameters: At least one character must be aware they're in a scenario where horror movie rules apply and attempt to use their knowledge to survive
Suggested answer: There's Nothing Out There (1991); while the thread isn't humanoid, a character is actively using his knowledge of movie tropes to survive the danger, and shares his knowledge with his friends. Honourable mentions: New Nightmare (1994): threat is humanoid in form, though hero not taking advantage of horror movie tropes; Scream (1996): threat is humanoid in form, heroes taking advantage of horror movie tropes.

First meta horror movie - it's futile
Parameters: At least one character must be aware they're in a scenario where horror movie rules apply but not necessarily able to stop what's going to happen
Suggested answer: Unmasked Part 25 (1988). It's the killer (Jackson) who understands the tropes but he comes to realize he's ultimately unable to change things.

Not sure which of the categories it should go in, but Fright Night (August 1985) fits as meta. Charlie Brewster recognizes that the new neighbor is a vampire because of his love of vampire movies and he (and later his ally Peter Vincent) use what said movies have taught them about vampire weaknesses in an attempt to fight them. Fright Night 2 (1988) also uses this - one character even goes further back than movies and reads Dracula to learn of vampire weaknesses mentioned there but which have been left out of the movie versions.

 

6/10/2022 6:46 am  #12


Re: Finding Firsts

Loki wrote:

Andy E. Nystrom wrote:

First meta horror movie - would be victims try to use tropes
Parameters: At least one character must be aware they're in a scenario where horror movie rules apply and attempt to use their knowledge to survive
Suggested answer: There's Nothing Out There (1991); while the thread isn't humanoid, a character is actively using his knowledge of movie tropes to survive the danger, and shares his knowledge with his friends. Honourable mentions: New Nightmare (1994): threat is humanoid in form, though hero not taking advantage of horror movie tropes; Scream (1996): threat is humanoid in form, heroes taking advantage of horror movie tropes.

First meta horror movie - it's futile
Parameters: At least one character must be aware they're in a scenario where horror movie rules apply but not necessarily able to stop what's going to happen
Suggested answer: Unmasked Part 25 (1988). It's the killer (Jackson) who understands the tropes but he comes to realize he's ultimately unable to change things.

Not sure which of the categories it should go in, but Fright Night (August 1985) fits as meta. Charlie Brewster recognizes that the new neighbor is a vampire because of his love of vampire movies and he (and later his ally Peter Vincent) use what said movies have taught them about vampire weaknesses in an attempt to fight them. Fright Night 2 (1988) also uses this - one character even goes further back than movies and reads Dracula to learn of vampire weaknesses mentioned there but which have been left out of the movie versions.

Actually, we might have even earlier. Salem's Lot, the 1979 miniseries, where young Mark Petrie uses what vampire movies have taught him to repel the vampiric Danny Glick from his window. Granted here it's solely the use of a cross that is explicitly something he learned from movies, rather than a wider use of knowledge of tropes, but still.

 

6/10/2022 7:54 am  #13


Re: Finding Firsts

First television mini-series:
BBC Television aired a six-episode adaptation of Little Women in 1950-51.

 

6/10/2022 8:51 am  #14


Re: Finding Firsts

I've added the latest suggestions, and split the meta horror movie category into vampire and "dead teenager" as those have different tropes.


My photostream (over 6 million photos!)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/24917258@N05/
     Thread Starter
 

6/10/2022 9:11 am  #15


Re: Finding Firsts

Andy E. Nystrom wrote:

First meta horror movie: vampire
Parameters: At least one character must be aware they're in a scenario where horror movie rules apply and attempt to use their knowledge to survive throughout. Must involve vampires in some fashion.
Suggested answer: zuckyd1: Fight Night (1985): vampire knowledge used throughout for survival. Honourable mention: The Fearless Vampire Hunters (1967): if memory serves, only one meta use and it's unsuccessful (cross used on Jewish vampre). Loki: Salem's Lot (1979): miniseries, not movie; only one meta use.

Fright Night rather than Fight Night. And not sure Fearless Vampire Killers would count, as I don't think he used the cross because of meta reasons, but instead because he was an out and out vampire hunter who'd studied vampire lore. He'd presumably learned of the lore from books about vampires and his master, but if we're going to allow non-specific in-universe treatises on vampires as a meta reference (rather than popular fiction, be they movies or supposedly fictional novels) then there's bound to be even earlier examples.

Andy E. Nystrom wrote:

First television mini-series, original story
Parameters: Television series devoted to a single subject as opposed to anthology, but always intended to end after the first season. Can feature characters seen before but must be itself a new story.
Suggested: The Prisoner (1967). While the series wasn't entirely serialized, it was always intended that the final episode of the season would conclude the story. Possibly a continuation of Danger Man/Secret Agent but still an original story if so.

Might be even earlier examples but:
The Broken Horseshoe (March-April 1952), BBC, a six part original thriller.
And for SF specifically
The Quatermass Experiment (1953). Six parts, aired in July-August 1953 on the BBC, later re-made as a movie. Did have sequels starring the eponymous lead character, but only because the original, self-contained story was so successful.
 

 

6/10/2022 12:23 pm  #16


Re: Finding Firsts

First television mini-series, US:
Davy Crockett (1954-55). Although based on a historical person, I don't think it was adapted from any specific source.

 

6/10/2022 12:39 pm  #17


Re: Finding Firsts

Found some earlier ones.

Ann and Harold, BBC, 1938, adapted from a radio play, 5 episodes but a sixth was originally planned. Since it was adapted from a single play and depicts a couple's developing romance, it was probably serialized.

Dr. Death, US, 1945. A 4-part thriller adapted from a novel, so probably serialized.

Last edited by zuckyd1 (6/10/2022 12:43 pm)

 

6/10/2022 12:56 pm  #18


Re: Finding Firsts

For a book that lists many cinematic firsts I highly recommend Patrick Robertson's Guinness Book of Movie Facts & Feats (which has also been published under several slightly different titles).
For more general historical firsts there are several books by Charles Panati.

Last edited by zuckyd1 (6/10/2022 12:56 pm)

 

6/10/2022 4:16 pm  #19


Re: Finding Firsts

I've added the latest suggestions. Any more suggestions for new topics? I won't suggest any more new topics until others have suggested a few more.


My photostream (over 6 million photos!)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/24917258@N05/
     Thread Starter
 

6/14/2022 8:51 am  #20


Re: Finding Firsts

First comic. This obviously requires qualifiers, and may end up needing to be split into subcategories. I think we have to require it tells its narrative in a mostly illustrated manner (so as to eliminate books that include a few illustrations amidst otherwise text tales), but also has to definitely be telling some sort of story in some capacity. 
That said:
First illustration which may be trying to convey a story of some variety: Arguably some cave paintings may be recordings of hunts and the like. The oldest known is over 64,000 years old, found in Maltravieso cave, Cáceres, Spain. 
The oldest one which looks like it might be telling a tale of a pig hunt is 43,900 years old and was found in caves in the Maros-Pangkep karst of South Sulawesi, Indonesia.
The Bayeux Tapestry, constructed somewhere between 1066 (as it depicts events from that year) and 1476 (the oldest known written mention of it), arguably has a stake in the game, as it tells an illustrated history of the Norman invasion of England by William the Conqueror, and includes some text alongside the figures. It's definitely telling a tale in mostly pictures with some text.
The Glasgow Looking Glass, 1825-1826, is currently the oldest known mass produced publication to tell stories in illustrated form, even including word balloons to show character dialogue, and so is arguably the first comic in (close-to) modern form. 
 

 

9/11/2022 3:29 am  #21


Re: Finding Firsts

Some possibly very specific firsts.

First story (any medium) to make sunlight fatal to vampires.
This is generally ascribed to 1922's Nosferatu. Prior to this sunlight had been stated as weakening a vampire's powers (cf the original Dracula novel), but not killing them. 

And while the above is fairly well known (and hopefully accurate), one I only heard about yesterday:
First account to claim that werewolves are vulnerable to silver, and first account to link their transformations to the moon, AND first account to say being bitten by a werewolf is how you become a werewolf? While I'd assumed that all of these came from perhaps different but centuries old legends of the beasts, allegedly all three actually originate with Universal's The Wolfman in 1941.

 

9/11/2022 2:59 pm  #22


Re: Finding Firsts

Loki wrote:

Some possibly very specific firsts. First story (any medium) to make sunlight fatal to vampires.This is generally ascribed to 1922's Nosferatu. Prior to this sunlight had been stated as weakening a vampire's powers (cf the original Dracula novel), but not killing them.  And while the above is fairly well known (and hopefully accurate), one I only heard about yesterday:First account to claim that werewolves are vulnerable to silver, and first account to link their transformations to the moon, AND first account to say being bitten by a werewolf is how you become a werewolf? While I'd assumed that all of these came from perhaps different but centuries old legends of the beasts, allegedly all three actually originate with Universal's The Wolfman in 1941.

Found this on TVTropes:
"There are references to the use of silver against werewolves as far back as in the 18th century or more. Back then silver was considered effective against all sorts of evil entities, and wasn't absolutely necessary in disposing them. In fact there are stories of using silver against them that go back to the 16th century, and possibly earlier, it merely wasn't that common until recently when this film [The Wolfman] made it popular."

And here's a quote from 1840:
"Two hundred years ago for a time there was a frightfully large number of werewolves in the city of Greifswald. They were especially prevelant in Rokover Street. From there they attacked anyone who appeared outside of their houses after eight o'clock in the evening. At that time there were a lot of venturesome students in Greifswald. They banded together and one night set forth against the monsters. At first they were powerless against them, until finally the students brought together all of the silver buttons that they had inherited, and with these they killed the werewolves." Source: J. D. H. Temme, Die Volkssagen von Pommern und Rügen (Berlin: In der Nicolaischen Buchhandlung, 1840), no. 259, p. 308.

Wikipedia states that links to the moon can occasionally be found in European werewolf myths:
"In Italy, France and Germany, it was said that a man or woman could turn into a werewolf if he or she, on a certain Wednesday or Friday, slept outside on a summer night with the full moon shining directly on his or her face."
And from Hungary: "The transformation usually occurred during the winter solstice, Easter and a full moon."
However, "along with the vulnerability to the silver bullet, the full moon being the cause of the transformation only became part of the depiction of werewolves on a widespread basis in the twentieth century."

The Nosferatu attribution appears to be completely accurate.

Last edited by zuckyd1 (9/11/2022 3:01 pm)

 

Board footera

 

Powered by Boardhost. Create a Free Forum