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7/19/2021 4:04 am  #1


Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

This is intended to be the version of the Things People Keep Getting Wrong thread, only for material outside the Marvel Megaverse. This fist post might eventually contain a Google Doc compilation list if this takes off. Some non-Marvel material was starting to slip into the main post, but since that post is predominately Marvel, I thought it would be better to place the non-Marvel material in its own thread.

Original thread name: Wrong People Keep Getting Things - Nun Marvel
 

Last edited by Andy E. Nystrom (1/17/2022 6:22 pm)


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7/19/2021 4:18 am  #2


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

The first two are related to this thread:

https://whowatchesthewatchers.boardhost.com/viewtopic.php?id=554

Incorrect: The main movie James Bond is multiple individuals using the same identity.
Truth: Dr. No through Die Another Day are all one continuity with the same Bond (see evidence in the above link), with a separate Bond in a separate continuity from Casino Royale (2008 version) to the upcoming No Time to Die and possibly beyond. In particular, a key event in On Her Majesty's Secret Service is often alluded to in subsequent movies.

Related to the above
Incorrect: James Bond is a code name for said multiple individuals.
Truth: It's probably not the best strategy but Bond uses his actual name in adventures a lot and its the same person. And even using the same code name over and over would not be much better strategy. There is no evidence in the movies that Bond is an alias, and in Skyfall someone from Bond's past recognizes him as Bond. Which is not to say that Bond has no code name. He absolutely does: It's 007.

Incorrect: The post-Crisis DC Universe was created by the merging of Earths 1, 2, 4, S, and X.
Truth: Ignoring Hypertime, which complicates the situation, in Crisis on Infinite Earths #10, the heroes went back to the beginning of time and prevented the splitting off of Earths. The new reality thus contains elements even of Earths that were previously destroyed, because in the new reality they were never split off into a multiverse in the first place. In at least one case a pre-Crisis Earth became a separate planet that was still destroyed (the former Earth-6).
 


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7/19/2021 5:10 am  #3


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

A few that I already posted in the other thread:
Incorrect: The Scarlet Pimpernel was the first masked vigilante character in fiction.
Truth: The Pimpernel may well be the one that caught the public imagination and popularised the concept, but he wasn't the first.

This came to my attention through a meme listing female contributions to SF fandom, which claims Baroness Orczy "created" the masked vigilante genre. As such, I want to make it clear that I'm not trying to denigrate Orczy's achievements or contributions to the field - the Pimpernel is a great creation and was hugely influential. But I can't agree with saying she created the genre when the Pimpernel wasn't the first such character. And the Pimpernel debuted in 1903, which places him after the Human Bat, who debuted in the story paper The Funny Wonder in 1899. It's possible others predated him - for example, I've seen it claimed that a Penny Dreadful portrayed the urban legend Spring-Heeled Jack as being a costumed vigilante even earlier than this, but that's not something I've been able to confirm - but regardless of whether the Human Bat turns out to be the first or not, he still predates the Scarlet Pimpernel. 

Incorrect: The Yellow Kid was the first merchandized comic strip character.
Truth: He was beaten on the merchandise front by Britain's Alley Sloper at the very least.

For a long time many early internet sites claimed Yellow Kid was the first ever comic strip character, but that myth gradually got beaten down by people pointing out the Kid's predecessors. However, it seems that the myth that he's the first one to get his own merchandise persists. Since the Yellow Kid debuted in 1895, and Ally Sloper had merchandise that predates this by at least a decade, the claim that the Kid was the first to have his own merchandise also falls down.

Incorrect: Sean Connery was the first/original James Bond.

Truth: Connery was the first movie Bond. However, Barry Nelson was the first actor to play the role, which he did in a TV show.

And while we're on this, in general terms it is very risky to claim someone or something is "the first" whatever. In so many cases, you can swiftly find examples that pre-date it, so be sure of yourself before you do so. The handbooks avoid that phrasing for this very reason.

One new one, tied to the last one above:
Incorrect: David Niven played Bond in Casino Royale BEFORE Sean Connery played Bond. 
Truth: Niven's Casino Royale came out in 1967; Connery's first outing as Bond was released in 1962.
Not sure why this one is even up for debate, as it's easy to confirm the dates the movies were released, but despite this I do see it pop up from time to time. I can only assume the people who say it just haven't bothered to do any basic checking (I wouldn't even deign to call it research, it requires so little effort).

 

7/19/2021 5:24 am  #4


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Incorrect: The Misfits of Science was cancelled because lead actor Dean Paul Martin (Dr. Billy Hayes) was killed in a plane crash.
Truth: The plane crash is unfortunately real but the timing, while close, doesn't add up: Misfits of Science ran from 1985 to 1986. Dean Paul Martin died in March 21, 1987, thus late in the 1986-1987 season. The timing is so close that it raises the question of whether he would have been available to go on the flight had the show been renewed (though even there it's likely filming would have been completed on the remaining episodes). Regardless, ratings are the most likely culprit in the show ending.
 


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7/19/2021 7:03 am  #5


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Incorrect: "Nun" is a valid alternate spelling for "Non"
Truth: It is not.

 

7/19/2021 7:06 am  #6


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

zuckyd1 wrote:

Incorrect: "Nun" is a valid alternate spelling for "Non"
Truth: It is not.

In much the same way that "Wrong People Keep Getting Things" is a valid rephrasing of "Things People Keep Getting Wrong"

Basically I was trying to deliberately put in an error, but if I "accidentally" called this the Marvel thread it would have caused confusion.


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7/20/2021 7:10 am  #7


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Here's one that at least used to be the case, though I don't know if this is still a common misconception
Incorrect: Carole Bouquet, lead actress in For Your Eyes Only was born a man.
Truth: Carole Bouquet was a woman from birth. There was a transgender actress, but she was a bit player, Tula/Caroline Cossey. The misconception arose because tabloids learned of her and "James Bond Star" makes better headlines than "James Bond Bit Actress with No Speaking Lines in the Movie".


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7/20/2021 6:35 pm  #8


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

A couple more. Every so often I'll change the subject line. People with Moderator privileges are also welcome to do the same; just make sure you put at least one "error" in the subject somewhere.

Incorrect: Frankenstein's Monster was a well meaning, misunderstood monster even in Mary Shelley's original novel.
Truth: The monster definitely had legitimate reasons to hate Dr. Frankenstein, but he killed quite a few innocent people just because Dr. Frankenstein knew them (and often was related to them). The Boris Karloff movie was when he was first depicted in a sympathetic light.

Incorrect: Bram Stoker, in his novel Dracula, intended pre-vampire Dracula to be the real life Vlad the Impaler.
Truth: That also came later. We only learn a little about pre-vampire Dracula from the novel, but from what we do know, he seems to have been a nicer person than Vlad was. There is nothing in the novel linking Dracula and Vlad.


 


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7/21/2021 9:04 am  #9


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Andy E. Nystrom wrote:

A couple more. Every so often I'll change the subject line. People with Moderator privileges are also welcome to do the same; just make sure you put at least one "error" in the subject somewhere.
 

Not sure how to do this. I was going to change "Wrong" to "Not Right"

 

7/21/2021 9:07 am  #10


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Moderators can change the subject line by clicking Edit on the first post only.


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9/25/2021 3:56 am  #11


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Incorrect: In the movie Moonraker, Jaws smiles at Dolly, showing his metal teeth. Dolly smiles back, showing her braces, causing them to fall in love immediately over their shared teeth issue; this causes Jaws to switch sides.
Truth: They do fall in love immediately after smiling at each other and Jaws does switch sides, but Dolly never wore braces.

Last edited by Andy E. Nystrom (9/25/2021 4:01 am)


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1/17/2022 6:19 pm  #12


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Incorrect: DC's first crack at licensing the Archie superheroes was called the Impact! line.
Truth: DC's first crack at licensing the Archie superheroes was called the !mpact line.

Incorrect: Rick's classic line in Casablanca was "Play it again, Sam!"
Truth: The line was actually, "You played it for her, you can play it for me. Play it, Sam."

Incorrect: A catch-phrase in Star Trek (original series) said by Kirk was "Beam me up, Scotty!"
Truth: Kirk never said that except in non-canon material, He has come close at times though: "Scotty, beam us up!" and even "Scotty, beam me up!" Often though he would tell Scott instead to "Energize".

Incorrect: On the A-Team, BA liked to say, "I pity the fool!"
Truth: While BA's actor Mister T had that as his catch-phrase, BA never said that.
 


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1/25/2022 12:10 pm  #13


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Incorrect: New Fun Comics#1 (1935) was the first comic to feature new material not reprinted from a newspaper strip (also sometimes stated as the first comic to feature all new material).
Truth: It's the first comic from what became DC. It may well be the first AMERICAN comic to feature non-reprint material. But there are British comics from at least as early as 1914 which featured new comic strips. I can't say for sure if these are the earliest - other British comics or ones from other countries might even be earlier - but regardless of these unknowns, what is certain is that New Fun Comics missed being first by at least a couple of decades.

 

1/27/2022 7:51 am  #14


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Incorrect: All revivals of old shows are reboots.
Truth: It's only a reboot if it's a brand new continuity. Otherwise it's a continuation.


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4/27/2022 5:23 pm  #15


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Incorrect: At least for a time, the Arrowverse multiverse was eliminated after Crisis (this has been used by some to claim that Superman and Lois, which uses the multiverse isn't canon).
Truth: This is a case of unreliable narrators. Many characters with some recollection of the Crisis (Barry, Cisco, etc.) certainly believe the multiverse was eliminated due to the Crisis, and we know that Earths 1, 3, and 38 at least have been merged as Earth-Prime. However, the ending of the Crisis crossover clearly showed other Earths being still around (they couldn't very well eliminate Earths in use by other shows and movies after all). And there was a line in Superman and Lois season one that hinted that Superman was surprised to learn of the multiverse's continued existence. So S&L is canon (just with a different style than the other shows). So it's simply the case that certain characters have arrived at reasonable but incorrect conclusions.
 


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6/08/2022 6:47 am  #16


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Incorrect: A popular children's book series is The Berenstein Bears
Truth: This is another example of the Mandela Effect. It's actually The Berenstain Bears.

Incorrect: Winnie-the-Pooh as he's largely depicted and all elements thereof entered the public domain.
Truth: The version with the red shirt is owned by Disney has not entered the public domain, though the unclothed version from the first book has. In addition, Tigger was introduced in the second book, The House at Pooh Corner (1928; the first book was from 1926) and is thus not yet in the public domain.

Incorrect: Superman was the first superhero
Truth: Mandrake (from comic strips) debuted in 1934, Green Hornet (on radio) debuted in 1934, Zorro (from pulp magazines) debuted in 1919. And of course some mythological figures such as Hercules are arguably superheroes. But even if you limit your scope to characters created for modern era American comic books, Doctor Occult (1935) still beats him, even wearing a costume before Superman's debut. This is not to diminish the character as Superman certainly set the template for superheroes and was the catalyst for the sub-genre.

Incorrect: The primary superhero who gets his powers from shouting "Shazam!" is and always was called Shazam.
Truth: This is true since 2011 but prior to that, the superhero was Captain Marvel and Shazam was the wizard who game him his powers. Probably most people on this forum know this but the misconception is more common in the general public.

Incorrect: Jor-El (or Jor-L) and Lara (or Lora) first appeared in Action Comics #1
Truth: Jor-El/Jor-L is mentioned there as an unnamed scientist but isn't actually depicted. Lara/Lora isn't even mentioned. Both first appeared in the Superman comic strip and Adventures of Superman novel before finally making a true comics appearance in More Fun Comics #101 1945. To be fair I haven't found any online references to te incorrect info but I suspect most people assume this to be the case.


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6/08/2022 8:33 am  #17


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Andy E. Nystrom wrote:

Incorrect: Superman was the first superhero
Truth: Mandrake (from comic strips) debuted in 1934, Green Hornet (on radio) debuted in 1934, Zorro (from pulp magazines) debuted in 1919. And of course some mythological figures such as Hercules are arguably superheroes. But even if you limit your scope to characters created for modern era American comic books, Doctor Occult (1935) still beats him, even wearing a costume before Superman's debut. This is not to diminish the character as Superman certainly set the template for superheroes and was the catalyst for the sub-genre.

I've seen people insist that you need the "full combination" of costume, alias/secret identity, powers and fighting crime/injustice as a way to try and eliminate some of those predecessors. However, even if we allowed for that restriction (and overlooked that it would also take the likes of Batman off the list of superheroes), you've got the likes of Night Hawk (1930) who meets all of those requirements, as does 1913's Winged Man, and even 1899's Human Bat

Superman was (afaik) the first character to actually be called a superhero, and he's definitely the character that truly caught fire and spread the concept, but once his debut established the requirements that needed to come together for a character to be considered a superhero we can see with hindsight that there were a lot of prior individuals who fit the description, 

 

12/25/2022 2:37 pm  #18


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Wrong pronunciations:

Incorrect: The e in Jekyll is soft.
Truth: The e in Jekyll is hard.

Incorrect: The eu in Dr. Seuss is pronounced "ew".
Truth: The eu in Dr. Seuss is pronounced "oy".

Incorrect: The first a in Ra's al Ghul is soft.
Truth: The first a in Ra's al Ghul is hard.
Interestingly, characters on Arrow seemed to use both pronunciations interchangably.

 


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12/25/2022 2:59 pm  #19


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Andy E. Nystrom wrote:

Wrong pronunciations:

Incorrect: The e in Jekyll is soft.
Truth: The e in Jekyll is hard.

 

Jekyll is very, very frequently mispronounced, and we actually have the correct pronunciation from Robert Louis Stevenson himself, when he was interviewed for the San Francisco Examiner on 7th June 1888. Asked about the correct way to say Jekyll, he replied:
‘By all means let the name be pronounced as though it spelt “Jee-kill”, not “Jek-ill”. Jekyll is a very good family name in England, and over there it is pronounced in the manner stated.'
 

 

12/25/2022 3:34 pm  #20


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

One I keep seeing brought up in a meme:

Incorrect: Mary Shelley invented science fiction / wrote the first SF story when she wrote Frankenstein.
Truth: Shelley's Frankenstein was massively influential in SF, but as with so many "this was the first example of this thing" claims, it's very, very debatable that it was the first.

1818's Frankenstein certainly includes vital elements of what is now considered SF - mad scientist uses technology beyond what actually existed at the time (or even now) to achieve goals real world science had yet to achieve. That wasn't Shelley's only work that is considered SF - she also wrote 1826's The Last Man, a dystopian tale about humanity being all but wiped out in the 21st century. The trouble is, if Shelley's The Last Man is considered SF, then so should Jean-Baptiste Cousin de Grainville's Le Dernier Homme (which also ironically translates as The Last Man), since it too deals with humanity dying out in the far future, and includes advanced science not existing in the real world as the hero travels the world in an airship. And Le Dernier Homme was published in 1805, thirteen years before Frankenstein...

Noted SF author Brian Aldiss might have been the originator of the claim that Frankenstein was the first "true" SF novel, and if not the one who initiated the claim he certainly spread the idea. But if Aldiss's own SF credentials are seen as making him a good judge of what counts and does not count, allowing him to distinguish "true" SF from "merely proto-SF" then surely famed astronomer Carl Sagan and SF literary giant Isaac Asimov's credentials would make them even more reliable judges of what counts, and both of them cite Johannes Kepler's Somnium from 1634 as the first work of science fiction. 

But what about Lucian of Samosata's True History, published in the 2nd century AD, in which the protagonist travels into space and encounters alien races on the moon and sun? 

The simple fact is that, much like "first superhero" or "first comic," it's hard to place one single thing as the start of these concepts. Rather than a single identifiable dividing line with "doesn't exist" on one side and "now exists" on the other, there are a series of developments on the road to these things evolving. Insisting something was the overall "first" is hard to justify, as you can usually either go "well, what about this earlier example" or "yeah, but that's not really fully developed so the actual first should be this later example" So often what people tout as the first is either based on incomplete knowledge or some personal agenda, and the latter cases tend to be touchy about having their claims challenged - I've been attacked by people online when I've suggested that Superman isn't the first superhero (since I am supposedly only doing so to take credit away from America for coming up with the concept) and that Frankenstein isn't the first SF story (since I am clearly only doing that because "I can't handle the idea that a woman invented SF"). 

 

12/25/2022 8:21 pm  #21


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

In addition, an argument could be made that the original Frankenstein novel wasn't even sci-fi: Victor, while recounting his story, made it clear he was revealing nothing of how he created the monster because he didn't want anyone to repeat the process. This was a key plot point.The whole lightning rod stuff came from the original movie. For all we know he could have mixed supernatural with scientific means and chosen not to tell anyone to throw them off the scent. We know something happened but not what it was.

Another Frankenstein one:
Incorrect: The literary Frankenstein Monster was misunderstood and persecuted.
Truth: The above is true of some cinematic versions and the literary version did have some legitimate grievances. However, he retaliated by killing every friend or family member of Victor's he could locate, including innocents, just to cause Victor pain. He did have some remourse, but he definitely had a cruel streak when angered and people were right to fear him.

 


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12/26/2022 6:39 am  #22


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Andy E. Nystrom wrote:

In addition, an argument could be made that the original Frankenstein novel wasn't even sci-fi: Victor, while recounting his story, made it clear he was revealing nothing of how he created the monster because he didn't want anyone to repeat the process. This was a key plot point.The whole lightning rod stuff came from the original movie. For all we know he could have mixed supernatural with scientific means and chosen not to tell anyone to throw them off the scent. We know something happened but not what it was.

Valid. I've seen earlier stories with SF tones being dismissed because they treat the science aspects more like fantasy/supernatural aspects - for example, True History because the trip into space is done in a regular sailing ship rather than some version of a spaceship - but if that discounts them and you need at least an attempt to dress the tale up to look like the fantastical aspects are science-based rather than magical, then your point would disqualify Frankenstein for the same reasons.

Andy E. Nystrom wrote:

Another Frankenstein one:
Incorrect: The literary Frankenstein Monster was misunderstood and persecuted.
Truth: The above is true of some cinematic versions and the literary version did have some legitimate grievances. However, he retaliated by killing every friend or family member of Victor's he could locate, including innocents, just to cause Victor pain. He did have some remorse, but he definitely had a cruel streak when angered and people were right to fear him.
 

Very true. Anyone who knows the original version should be able to recognize that Victor is a scummy excuse for a human being - his initial rejection of the creature based purely on its appearance leads it to somewhat justifiably hate him, and promising to make it a mate so it can simply have some companionship only to then renege leads to murderous retaliation. Victor's worst action though is letting the poor maid be wrongly blamed and executed for a murder the creature committed; maybe no one would have believed him if he'd told them it was the creature, but as a medical doctor he could have pointed out the victim, Victor's younger brother William, was clearly strangled by someone possessing much larger hands than the unfortunate maid. Or told a version of the truth, saying that he'd managed to unwittingly cross some murderous ruffian while away from home, and witnessed said ruffian near his family home when he returned upon hearing of William's death, thus providing a viable, if vague, alternate suspect. Heck, any sort of attempt to at least try to save the poor maid's life, rather than keeping quiet for fear of exposing his own wrongdoings. 

However, for all that Victor was a scuzzball, the monster is not an innocent party. Unlike the early movies the monster is mentally fully developed by the point where it murders William, an innocent child whose only crime was being the younger sibling of Victor. And likewise Victor's unfortunate bride is not guilty of anything other than loving the wrong man. The creature knows full well it is killing people who have done it no wrong and mean it no ill will, merely for the sake of mentally torturing the man it actually has cause to hate. I'm personally very much of the "I am sorry to learn that XXX had a really terrible childhood where they were mentally abused, turning them into a twisted psychopath. I have sympathy for that poor child. However, since they are now a psycho-serial killer slaughtering people, they need to be put down ASAP." mindset.
 

 

3/11/2023 7:55 pm  #23


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Incorrect: The "New Look" Batman is a strong candidate for the first appearance of the Earth-1 Batman.
Truth: There is exactly a 0% chance that this is the case, despite what Who's Who #2 claims.

Determining the exact first appearance of Earth-1 Batman is difficult if not impossible. On the surface Detective Comics #327 (first New Look) may seem like a strong candidate. Batman gets a new costume and his adventures, while still whimsical are more grounded in reality. But it's, at minimum, over four years off.

There are many theories, including that some transitional stories happened on both Earths. But we can pinpoint an absolute no later than, no doubt about it appearance of Batman that has to be Earth-1. It can't be Detective Comics #327 because that was cover dated May 1964. The reason why we can rule that out is that Batman appeared in the first Justice League story in The Brave and the Bold #28 March 1960. The Earth-2 Batman was a member of the Justice Society but never the Justice League, so it has to be Earth-1 Batman in that story. That doesn't mean it was his first appearance or even that the Batman "solo" (usually with Robin) stories were on Earth-1 in 1960, but The Brave and the Bold #28 is certainly the earliest confirmable appearance of the Earth-1 Batman.
 


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3/17/2023 9:26 am  #24


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

This one's a bit more out of story but I think it's still worth noting:

Incorrect: A US core five network series lives or dies depending on how well it does compared to other shows in the same timeslot.
Truth: People watching other shows instead can certainly contribute to a show's demise, but only indirectly. The bigger factor is how well it does compared to other shows on the same network, as the network wants to maximize the advertising dollars. So if new episodes of a show are routinely beaten in the ratings by reruns on another network but it still manages to be the fourth highest rated show on its network, it'll probably survive because it's bringing in more advertising dollars than quite a few other shows. There are other factors as well, such as whether a show is produced in house, but that's the big one.
 


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5/28/2023 2:32 am  #25


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

Incorrect: Lev Gleason's Bombshell, son of the god Mars, has the real name Dryas.
Truth: Bombshell is only ever called Bombshell in his stories, even by his father.

Dryas is a fan-made name that originated on The Unofficial Guide to the Mythological Universe, and despite that site stating clearly that it is the originator of the name, at least one other site must have mistaken/misread it as factual and once that happened, and since it was (or at least used to be) hard to get hold of the Golden Age stories to check directly, lots of other sites have assumed the info was correct and spread it.

 

11/11/2023 12:43 pm  #26


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

One I can't say for 100% certain I'm right on, but I'm fairly certain and will lay out the reasoning why.

I recently got into a debate on Facebook about this image of Doc Savage:

where another poster said this was Doc wearing a skullcap, and I said it was just his hair. The other poster pointed out that in the original pulp novels Doc's hair was longer than this, which is entirely true:

but artist James Bama's iconic version, used in later reprints and seen in the first image, influenced his depiction, and the shorter version became more common. Doc did indeed sometimes wear a bronze-colored metal skullcap, though only if he anticipated he'd be going into a gunfight. And crucially, when he did that, he also wore a bulletproof vest, because why protect your head but not the vital organs in your chest? 

Note that on the left he's not wearing the skullcap, but the hairline is virtually identical to when he's wearing the skullcap - the only way you can tell the difference is that the skullcap has longer "sideburns" down the front side of the ears to help hold it in place, and there is texturing drawn on the hair that's not there on the metal skullcap. And here's two other Bama images where you can more clearly see that there's texturing on the stuff atop his head, suggesting hair rather than metal. 

and here's a picture of a man with similarly short hair. Ignoring the exact lines of the hair and just comparing shape and texture and you've got a very similar look. 

Lastly, Bama depicts Doc looking like that on virtually every bit of art he did, but also depicts Doc with a ripped shirt most of the time. So either he ALWAYS drew Doc wearing a skullcap yet not bothering with a bulletproof vest, or else he just liked showing Doc with a buzzcut. My money is on the latter. 

 

2/27/2024 2:51 am  #27


Re: Things People Don't Keep Getting Wrong - Non-Marvel

The spellings of the two J. Stewarts:
Truth: John Stewart for Green Lantern, Jon Stewart for comedian/political commentator
 


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